Source: American Journal of Science and Arts, 2nd Series, Vol 41, Nov 1866

pp [illegible]

Meteorites of Aumale, Algeria:

A fall of meteorites took place on the 25th of August last between 11 and 12m., in Algiers, in the district of Aumale, and 50 kilometers north of that village. The mass taken to Algiers weighed 6.8 kil., but the whole meteorite is estimated at beyond 25 kil.

On the same day and hour, a second meteorite fell in the region of the tribe of Senhada, “fraction des Beni-Ouelben,” 4800 meters N. 12° E. from the place of fall of the former, in 0° 20′ E. and 36° 27′ N. This second specimen was about as large as the first, and was like it also in having approximately the form of a parallelapiped.

The meteorites consist mostly of a fine-grained, ash-gray stony substance, scratching glass easily. In this base small metallic grains are disseminated, part composed of nickeliferous iron; numerous of a yellow bronze color, acting like monosulphuret of iron; some of brass-yellow possessing the characters of ordinary pyrites; black grains of chromiron in regular octahedrons with truncated edges. The specific gravity of the meteorite is 3.65. One marked peculiarity is the presence of salts soluble in water, consisting of chlorid of sodium with some carbonate of soda. The thin crust of the meteorite is dull black, slightly rugose. Within the mass there are planes, nearly flat, which are striated evidently by the friction of the two surfaces.

 

Source: Reports of the BAAS, 1866, p132 et seq

(6.) 1865, August 25th, 11h 30m A.M.  Aumale, Algeria

(Comptes Rendus, 1866, January 8th, vol, lxii.)

A meteorite fell near the small stream Oued Soufflat, thirty-two miles north of the town of Aumale, an explosion like the roar of artillery first proceeding from a cloud in the air. The stone then fell, penetrating in fallow land 8 inches, and burying itself 12 inches deeper in hard calcareous earth, where it remained too hot to be extricated by the hand. Its figure when dug out was a four-sided pyramid, 14 inches high, truncated at the top; the base 8 inches by 6 inches, the upper face 4 inches square.  It weighted about 50lb. A second of the same size fell at a place about twelve miles N. by E., in N. latitude 36° 27′ E. longitude 3° 40′, which cut off branches from a shrub, excavated a hole 1 yard wide and 1 foot deep, and afterwards rolled down the mountain-side into a pathway, where it was found.

The specific gravity is 3.56; the crust is thin, dull black, and rough. The stones attract the magnet and contain about 10 per cent., by weight, of metallic iron alloyed with nickel. Sulpheret of iron is also present, with chrome-iron in small octahedral crystals. The meteorites contain soluble salts of sode (carbonate and chloride), and consist in their earthy portions of double silicates of iron and magnesia, partly attackable and partly unattacked by muriatic acid. The greenish-grey spherules, very hard and compact, with crystals of Enstatye and Peridote, and other mineral scattered through the stone, are described by M. Daubrée as they appeared under the microscope.

The meteorites consist mostly of a fine-grained, ash-gray stony substance, scratching glass easily. In this base small metallic grains are disseminated, part composed of nickeliferous iron; numerous of a yellow bronze color, acting like monosulphuret of iron; some of brass-yellow possessing the characters of ordinary pyrites; black grains of chromiron in regular octahedrons with truncated edges. The specific gravity of the meteorite is 3.65. One marked peculiarity is the presence of salts soluble in water, consisting of chlorid of sodium with some carbonate of soda. The thin crust of the meteorite is dull black, slightly rugose. Within the mass there are planes, nearly flat, which are striated evidently by the friction of the two surfaces.